Tag: video

Media Options for Conversation-Driven eLearning

Rather than delivering eLearning content as a lecture, you can explain it through conversations. While more resource-intensive multimedia may be desired, you have a range of options with this technique. It’s possible to use conversations even with a low budget. In the past, I’ve created conversation-driven eLearning with video, animation, and photos.

Video

You can use video to introduce the characters and the challenge they’re facing. Video is especially helpful for courses where non-verbal communication is critical to understanding. With good actors and production quality, this gives your course the feel of a TV show intro. The next time you’re watching TV, pay attention to how the conflict of the story is introduced via a short segment before the title sequence.

My Story-Based Coaching and Mentoring Course for Cine Learning Productions used this technique with a video introduction. After the initial video, we used cutout still photos of the same actors. This requires a custom photo shoot, but it’s much cheaper than using video for the entire course.

Animation

As an alternative to video, you can use illustrated characters with animation. I use full animation only for the intro and closing, similar to how I use video to set up the story in the course described above. After the intro, use stills of the same characters. The animation can be engaging to “hook” learners at the beginning, but it may become distracting once you’re delivering content.

We used animated characters for this professional development course for teachers. In the intro and closing (plus a few transitions between sections), the characters were the focus of the image. During most of the content delivery, the voice over continued as a conversation between the two characters, but the visuals supported the content rather than the characters.

Animated course with closed captions

Photos or Illustrations

If your budget doesn’t allow for custom video or animation, character photos or illustrations can certainly work. I would generally opt for photos from a library like eLearning Art over illustrations, but it depends on your audience.

If using more intensive multimedia will subtract from the resources to create more realistic practice exercises or other valuable learning experiences, you should cut the complexity of the media. Cathy Moore asks “What’s the real cost of eye candy?” Video and animation can be “eye candy” rather than adding value. Think about the trade off for media.

Voice Over…Or Not

While I find voice over to be beneficial, you can do a read-only version. Try a comic book or graphic novel style with conversation bubbles. I created this brief example with photos and conversation bubbles debunking the learning styles myth. This was created in PowerPoint; no rapid development tools were needed. Even on a low budget, you can immerse learners in a conversation rather than a didactic presentation.

Conversation between two employees

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Image credits: Graphic Stock (unlimited downloads $99/year), eLearning Brothers

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