Tag: Twine

Managing the Complexity of Branching Scenarios

On reddit, someone asked how to manage the complexity of branching scenarios and keep them from growing out of control. One of the issues with branching scenarios is that you can get exponential growth. If each choice has 3 options, you end up with 9 slides after just 2 choices, and 27 after 3 choices. This is 40 pages total with only 3 decisions per path. For most projects, that’s more complexity than you want or need.

Branching scenario with exponential growth

So how do you manage this complexity?

Use Twine

One way to make this branching easier to manage is by creating your scenarios in Twine. Twine makes it very easy to draft scenarios and check how all the connections flow together. No matter how complex your scenario is, Twine makes it easier to create it. Cathy Moore has an example of a scenario she built in Twine. This scenario has 57 total decision points, but it only took her 8 hours to create.

You can use Twine as your initial prototype, or you can use it as your final product. I have used Twine as my initial draft and prototype, then exported everything to Word as a storyboard for developers to build the final version in Storyline.

Planning a Scenario

Before I sit down to write a scenario, I always know my objectives. What are you teaching or assessing?

I usually have an idea of how long the ideal or perfect path will be. If you have a multi-step process, that’s your ideal path. If there’s going to be 4 decision points on the shortest path, I know what those are before I start writing.

I also usually know at least some of the decision points based on errors or mistakes I need to address.

There’s a limit to how much you can plan before you just start writing it out though. I find it’s easier to just open up Twine and figure it out within that system.

Allow Opportunities to Fix Mistakes

One trick for managing the potentially exponential growth is by giving learners a chance to get back on the right path if they make a minor error. If they make 2 or 3 errors in a row, they get to an ending and have to restart the whole thing.

For example, maybe you’re teaching a communication skill where they should start with an open-ended question before launching into a sales pitch. Choice A is the open-ended question (the best choice). Choice B is a closed question (an OK choice). Choice C is jumping right into the sales pitch without asking (bad choice). After the customer response for choice B, I’d give them an opportunity to use the open-ended question (A) as their follow up. Reusing some choices helps keep it from growing out of control. In this image, reusing choices cuts the total number of pages from 40 to 20.

Flowchart for branching scenario with 20 pages Make Some Paths Shorter

Not every path needs to be the same length. In the above image, one branch from choice C is shorter. It ends after 2 choices instead of 3. You might make a short path if people make several major errors in a row. Past a certain point, it makes sense to  ask people to reset the scenario from the beginning or backtrack to a previous decision.

Good, OK, and Bad

In branching scenarios, not everything is as black and white as a clear-cut right or wrong answer. You can have good, OK, and bad choices and endings. In this example from my portfolio, green is good choices/endings, orange is OK choices/endings, and red is bad choices/endings. In this scenario, if you choose 39 (bad), you have 3 options: 40 (back on the good path, recovering from the mistake), 41 (OK), and 42 (a bad choice leading to a restart). This example has 15 endings, which is still more than I would like; if I was redoing it now I would probably collapse a few more of those endings together.

Branching scenario flowchart with good, OK, and bad choices and endings

Your Ideas?

Do you have any suggestions or tips for managing and reducing the complexity of branching scenarios? Please share in the comments.

ID and E-Learning Links (2/8/15)

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