Tag: research

ID and eLearning Links (6/3/18)

    • Gamification works when it’s designed thoughtfully and stays focused on learning goals. Sharon Boller shares guidelines and picks apart some questionable research.

      tags:gamification research learning

      • 1. Keep game complexity simple, particularly when you are using a game to support relatively short lessons.
      • 2. Reward players for performance, not completion.
      • 3. Be cautious with leaderboards.
      • 4. As much as possible, align the game element choices you use to the learner’s actual job context.
      • 5. Make the in-game goal align with the learning goal in a reasonable way that “makes sense” for the learners who will play your game or complete your gamified lesson.
      • 6. Stop thinking you have to make the game super “fun.”
    • Create a custom seekbar with a web object in Storyline. Only works for HTML5, not Flash. Download their widget for free and use it as a web object on any slide where you need a seekbar. Note: it’s free, but you have to share the post on social media in order to download it.

      tags:Storyline html5

    • This is geared toward individual experts or consultants who want to launch their own self-service courses. For most of this audience, they don’t even want to self-host with LearnDash (although he mentions that too). I am periodically contacted by people who fit this audience and don’t have the resources to hire an instructional designer. This might be a helpful article for that audience.

      tags:LMS consulting

    • Free tool for creating vector graphics with a desktop and cloud version

      tags:tools graphics free

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Instructional Design and E-Learning Links

ID and eLearning Links (5/6/18)

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Instructional Design and E-Learning Links

ID and eLearning Links (3/18/18)

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Instructional Design and E-Learning Links

ID and eLearning Links (2/11/18)

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Instructional Design and E-Learning Links

ID and eLearning Links (1/21/18)

    • Will Thalheimer shares some new questions using the techniques in his Performance-Based Smile Sheet book, including a simplified version of his “world’s best smile sheet question.”

      tags:assessment training

      • Recently, in working with a company to improve their smile sheet, a first draft included the so-called World’s Best Smile Sheet Question. But they were thinking of piloting the new smile sheet for a course to teach basic electronics to facilities professionals. Given the topic and audience, I recommended a simpler version:

        How able will you be to put what you’ve learned into practice on the job?  Choose one.

        A. I am NOT AT ALL ready to use the skills taught.
        B. I need MORE GUIDANCE to be GOOD at using these skills
        C. I need MORE EXPERIENCE to be GOOD at using these skills.
        D. I am FULLY COMPETENT in using these skills.
        E. I am CAPABLE at an EXPERT LEVEL in using these skills.

        This version nicely balances precision with word count.

    • I asked in Julie Dirksen’s Facebook group if there was any eye tracking research specific to elearning. I’ve read research related to general web reading and usability, but I wondered if there are any differences in attention when people are reading to deliberately and consciously learn. Brian McGowan helpfully pulled together this list of resources as a starting point for research.

      tags:e-learning research usability attention

    • Companies with more remote workers have more women in leadership roles because the focus is on productivity and results, not office politics or “face time.”

      tags:research telecommuting

      • The study’s authors speculate that the reason the numbers are so high is because women at remote or mostly remote companies are more likely to be fairly evaluated.

        “It’s because remote work requires companies to focus on the most important aspects of work—productivity, progress, results—rather than less important things like face time in the office, office politics, traditional notions of what leadership ‘looks like,’ popularity or likability, or hours spent at your desk,” they write.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Instructional Design and E-Learning Links