Tag: evaluation

ID and eLearning Links (1/21/18)

    • Will Thalheimer shares some new questions using the techniques in his Performance-Based Smile Sheet book, including a simplified version of his “world’s best smile sheet question.”

      tags:assessment training

      • Recently, in working with a company to improve their smile sheet, a first draft included the so-called World’s Best Smile Sheet Question. But they were thinking of piloting the new smile sheet for a course to teach basic electronics to facilities professionals. Given the topic and audience, I recommended a simpler version:

        How able will you be to put what you’ve learned into practice on the job?  Choose one.

        A. I am NOT AT ALL ready to use the skills taught.
        B. I need MORE GUIDANCE to be GOOD at using these skills
        C. I need MORE EXPERIENCE to be GOOD at using these skills.
        D. I am FULLY COMPETENT in using these skills.
        E. I am CAPABLE at an EXPERT LEVEL in using these skills.

        This version nicely balances precision with word count.

    • I asked in Julie Dirksen’s Facebook group if there was any eye tracking research specific to elearning. I’ve read research related to general web reading and usability, but I wondered if there are any differences in attention when people are reading to deliberately and consciously learn. Brian McGowan helpfully pulled together this list of resources as a starting point for research.

      tags:e-learning research usability attention

    • Companies with more remote workers have more women in leadership roles because the focus is on productivity and results, not office politics or “face time.”

      tags:research telecommuting

      • The study’s authors speculate that the reason the numbers are so high is because women at remote or mostly remote companies are more likely to be fairly evaluated.

        “It’s because remote work requires companies to focus on the most important aspects of work—productivity, progress, results—rather than less important things like face time in the office, office politics, traditional notions of what leadership ‘looks like,’ popularity or likability, or hours spent at your desk,” they write.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Instructional Design and E-Learning Links

Voice Over Script Review Checklist

I’ve written several posts with tips on how to write voice over scripts. This review checklist summarizes all of the tips from the previous three posts into a single Word document you can download and use yourself.

Voice Over Checklist

Voice Over Script Review Checklist

Feel free to edit this document to match the requirements of your specific organization as long as you retain attribution to me with a link. If you improve this document, I’d love to hear about it.

Here is the complete list from the checklist:

  • The script has been read aloud
  • Script flows well; no awkward or clunky sentences
  • No grammar errors
  • Conversational tone
  • First and/or second person (I, we, you) are used
  • Contractions are used if style allows
  • No overly complicated sentences; variety of sentence length with shorter sentences
  • Pronunciation guides included for jargon, abbreviations, acronyms, and numbers
  • Emphasis in sentences marked as needed
  • Punctuate to mark pauses
  • Readable spacing, font, and font size (at least 12-14 pts)
  • Screen names clearly labeled
  • Numbers are written out as you want them said
  • Lists are written in conversational sentences (first choice) or punctuated for clarity and ease of reading aloud (second choice)
  • Serial comma used for all lists
  • Latin abbreviations are written out or noted: e.g. (“for example”), i.e. (“that is”), and etc. (“et cetera” or “and so on”)

For further explanation of the above points, review the previous posts in the series:

  1. Writing Style Tips for Voice Over Scripts
  2. Formatting Tips for Voice Over Scripts
  3. Voice Over Script Pitfalls

I want to give Jill Goldman of Goldivox one more shout out for being so helpful in putting these posts together.