Tag: eLearning Guild

I’m Speaking at LS Con

I’m presenting a session on Avoiding Voice Over Script Pitfalls. for the eLearning Guild’s Learning Solutions Conference. If you’re attending the conference, it’s session LS403 on Wednesday afternoon. (Unfortunately, I’m opposite Michael Allen and several other promising sessions. Sigh.) If you’re planning to attend the conference, I hope to meet you in person. This is the first conference I’ve attended in several years, and I’m excited to connect with people I only know online.

Learning Solutions Conference and Expo. I'm Speaking.

Here’s the official description:

You asked your voice-over artist for a natural, conversational recording, but what you got back is stiff and formal. You waste time going back and forth with voice-over talent about pronunciation or rewording. Too often, you need to re-record voice-over due to errors or confusion. You need a process to make your script writing more efficient and effective.

In this session, you will learn one proven technique you can use to avoid many voice-over script pitfalls, regardless of whether you use professional voice-over talent or record it yourself. You’ll also learn how to identify and correct common errors and how to adapt your writing style for more engaging, conversational narration. You’ll practice editing some sample scripts during the session so you can immediately apply what you learn. You will also receive a review checklist you can take with you and share with your team to improve the quality and consistency of your scripts.

More posts to come about LS Con!

ID and E-Learning Links (1/29/17)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Instructional Design and E-Learning Links

ID and e-Learning Links (2/24/14)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Story-Based Coaching and Mentoring Course

One technique for creating a more story-based course is using two characters who explain the content via a conversation. I usually use one character who acts as a coach and one character who is similar to the audience–same job role, same level of experience. In this example, the audience is new managers who don’t have much experience with coaching and mentoring. I wrote this course as part of Cine Learning Productions Custom Leadership Training (CLT) program.

I set up the story with a short video at the beginning of the course. This introduces the characters and shows the challenge the protagonist, new manager Michael, faces while coaching one of his employees. I wanted a scenario that showed a clear problem that could be solved through better coaching. If I create a good story at the beginning, I know I can “hook” the learners. I want them to think, “Oh! I’ve felt this same way. I’ve got the same problem as Michael.”

Michael is having one of those days. After finishing yet another coaching session with April, she still doesn’t grasp the basics of client relations. At his wits end, he goes to his manager, Pamela, who helps him discover a better way to coach through a session of their own.

After the introduction video, the rest of the course was built in Storyline with photos and voice over by the actors in the video. Learners listen in during Michael’s coaching session with Pamela.

Pamela and Michael discussing coaching

A traditional e-learning course probably would have used a single narrator reading a bullet point list like this:

Here are the reasons coaching and mentoring are important in our organization:

  • Employees are more likely to stay if they are supported by managers.
  • Developing employee skills reduces employee turnover.
  • It helps build our talent pool.
  • Building employee skills lets us promote from within.

In this course, the same content is delivered in a conversational style, as if the two characters were having a coaching session. This does increase the overall word count, but I think it’s more engaging than reading a list. Even with a really good voice over person, it’s tiring to listen to the same voice for long stretches; this method breaks it up so you always alternate between the voices.

Pamela: Michael, as you know, our organization really values good coaching and mentoring. Why do you think we view it as so important?

Michael: Well, it probably helps keep people here in the organization. People are more likely to stay if they’re supported by their managers and developing new skills.

Pamela: You’re right. It also helps build our pool of talent. We want to promote from within, and that means we need to develop our people so they’re ready to move up.

Michael: Right. I wasn’t ready for a management position when I started here, but I’ve developed new skills since then. At least, I thought I had…

In the eLearning Guild’s research report Using Stories for Learning: Answers to Five Key Questions, Karl Kapp describes a study which found that people remembered more from a brochure when information was presented in a narrative format rather than a bullet point list. Using stories for learning helps us make sense of the content.

The activities in the course either ask learners to reflect on their personal skills or respond to scenarios. This activity provides a scenario and asks learners to follow guidelines for providing feedback.

Coaching feedback activity

In the final activity for the course, everything is tied back to the beginning. Learners create a plan for coaching April in the scenario from the introductory video; they create a solution for the problem at the beginning of the course.

Scenario for the Coaching and Mentoring Plan Activity

The customer response to this course has been positive. Len Carter, V.P. of H.R. for FHN said, “Truly, these were the best online products for leadership development we’ve ever purchased. We’ll be purchasing more in 2014!”

Have you created this style of story-based course? Do you see opportunities where you could use it in the future?

Why a Wiki?

Our team uses a wiki to document our design and development processes, something I wrote about in a short column for the eLearning Guild’s Learning Solutions magazine. This weekend I was imagining a conversation between two people about the benefits of a wiki. This overlaps quite a bit with the reasons in my article, but it’s a more fun presentation with Xtranormal.

I kept this conversation pretty generic; I think these reasons apply to documentation for any kind of group, not just instructional designers or e-learning developers. This also focuses exclusively on the “why” of wikis. If you want more ideas on the “how,” check out my article in Learning Solutions. (Registration is required to read the articles, but even free Associate members get this benefit.)