Tag: eLearning Guild

What I Learned at LSCon18

Last month, I attended the Learning Solutions 2018 Conference in Orlando. Once again, it was a great experience. I had fun meeting people like Judy Katz, Tracy Parish, Cammy Bean, and Clark Quinn in person who I have known online for years, plus seeing people again from last year.

Now that I’ve had a few weeks to process and reflect, I want to summarize some of what I learned. I did a similar post last year, and it helped me reinforce and remember what I learned. This is my own “spaced repetition” to help me use these ideas. These comments won’t always be the most important thing each speaker said, but one thing I took away from the session and think I can apply in my own work.

Diane Elkins: Microlearning Morning Buzz

One of the things I appreciated from Diane’s discussion was the balanced approach. This wasn’t the “microlearning will solve all of our problems!” hyperbole I see from many sources. We talked about how microlearning is sometimes a solution, sometimes on its own, sometimes in combination with other forms of training.

Diane also shared a really great idea for training where you have to meet a certain minimum time to meet a legal or regulatory requirement. Instead of doing lots of content dump (which is sometimes padded to fill the required time), why not do just the minimum content plus a lot of practice and maybe reflection?

As a side note, Diane’s hand puppet demonstrations of pointless conversations with SMEs are hilarious.

Kai Kight: Composing Your World

As a musician and former music educator, it was really fun to hear a session start with violin and to watch the reactions of the audience.

One of the ideas from his keynote was to not get so wrapped up in the notes that you forget who you’re playing for. That applies to our work (and many fields); we have to always keep thinking about the audience and what they need.

Kevin Thorn: Comics for Learning

This was a session I attended specifically because it’s outside of what I normally do for work. I’m not quite sure how I’m going to apply this yet, but thinking about the various visual styles for comics gives me some new ideas.

Kevin shared a ton of research, examples, and resources. One that I need to dig into more is the Visual Language Lab.

Ann Rollins and Myra Roldan: Low-Cost, High-Impact AR Experiences

This was another session where I have no experience with the topic, but was curious to see some possibilities. My biggest takeaway is that several tools for simple AR are pretty affordable and easy enough to get started. Simple things like showing a video or a little information to explain features is very doable. We tested Zappar in the session to create a quick sample, but Layar also looks promising.

Julie Dirksen: Strategies for Supporting Complex Skill Development

I took 5 pages of notes from this session, so this could be several blog posts on its own.

How do you know if something is a skill or not? Is it reasonable to think that someone can be proficient without practice? If not, it’s a skill.

One idea I’m going to start using immediately is for self-paced elearning where I ask learners to type a longer answer. I have been using a model answer to compare as a way to help learners evaluate their own work, which is a good start. Julie talked about giving learners a checklist to guide their self-evaluation even more. I can implement that right now.

Tracy Parish: Free eLearning Design Tools

This was a discussion about free tools and how people use them, based largely on Tracy’s immense list of free tools.

Platon: Powerful Portraits

This was an engaging keynote because he has so many great stories about famous (and not famous) people.

One idea he shared was that if you can get people to see themselves in the story you put forward, maybe you can build bridges to connect people.

Cammy Bean: Architecting for Results

The big idea from this presentation was to think about broader systems for learning. Instead of content in a single event, it’s a journey over time. It’s a mix of what you do before the training, during the training, and after the training, but we often focus just on the middle portion.

The mix is going to be a little different for every program. This model is one way to think about the different pieces.

  1. Engage
  2. Diagnose
  3. Learn/Understand
  4. Apply
  5. Assess
  6. Reinforce

The simplified version is Prepare – Learn – Practice – Reflect.

Connie Malamed: Design Critique Party

The best thing I took away from this session was actually the protocol for requesting and giving critiques.

The protocol for the designer requesting critique:

  1. State your objective.
  2. Walk people through the experience.
  3. Say what you’d like to get feedback on
  4. Become an impartial observer

The protocol for giving critique:

If your objective is ____________, then _________ [critique].

Joe Fournier: Novel Writing Tricks

One idea from this session was about how the idea of a theme might apply to learning. The theme ties to the objective. It’s the emotional or value shift in a story. In learning, the theme might be how reporting employee theft is better for everyone.

Panel: Evolution of Instructional Design

This panel included Connie Malamed, Diane Elkins, Kevin Thorn, and Clark Quinn.

Diane Elkins pointed out that in classroom training, we often ask questions that only a few people will answer, and we don’t track them. If it’s OK to do that in classroom training, why not do it in elearning too? It’s OK to ask learners to type longer answers even though some of them will skip it. Let’s not punish the people who are willing to do the work and learn more just because we can’t track it or not everyone will do it.

David Kelly moderated the panel, and he pointed out how our field has a lot of “shiny object syndrome.” We’re often looking for “one tool to rule them all” that will fix every problem in every situation. That just doesn’t exist.

David Kelly: Shifting from Microlearning to Micromoments

There is no definition of microlearning. There are lots of opinions, some of which are labeled as definitions.

Maybe we should be thinking about micro as in microscope: something that narrows the scope of focus to a tiny part of the whole.

Bethany Vogel & Cara Halter: cMOOCs can be Effective

They used Intrepid Learning as the platform, which may be worth exploring more.

In their model, a MOOC is a time-bound online program that contains highly contextualized spaced, micro, and social learning. “Massive” and “Open” aren’t really part of their model, so I admit I’m not sure why they’re calling it a MOOC (other than that’s what their clients are asking for). I think you could do this same model with moderated social, spaced learning and call it “blended” or a “journey.” The experience was good, even if I might quibble with the label.

Photos

You can get a feel for the conference here.

 

Instructional Design Isn’t Dying. It’s Evolving.

You may have read dire predictions that instructional design is dead. The eLearning Guild just published a report titled “Is instructional design a dying art?” One of the guild’s recent surveys asked participants if ID is a dying field. Is it really?

Recently emerged monarch butterfly

No, It’s Not Dying; It’s Evolving

Instructional design is not dead or dying. That’s clickbait. This is a perennial hand wringing exercise. Marc Rosenberg wrote about it in 2004, and even 13 years ago he mentioned that this pops up every few years.

Instructional design isn’t dying; it’s evolving. Instructional design previously evolved from only classroom training to classroom plus online training. Now the field continues to evolve and expand. In fact, in the Guild report mentioned above, all 13 industry thought leaders agreed that instructional design is changing rather than dying.

As the field evolves, the name may change from instructional design to learning design, learning experience design or something else. I now call myself a “learning design consultant” rather than instructional designer. Regardless of the name, the core skills of instructional design will continue to be valuable and needed in the workplace.

Fragmentation and Diversification

I think instructional design will continue to fragment and diversify. Formal training isn’t disappearing; workers have too many skills they need and switch careers too often. In fact, I think ongoing formal training may even increase. Formal training will be accompanied by more informal training and performance support.

We will continue to have more potential skills than any single person can learn, so we will work more often in teams with specialists in particular skills.

New Technology and More Options

New technologies will give IDs new options. New technology often won’t completely replace old technology, but old and new will exist side-by-side. Sometimes how we use older technology will change. When TV became prevalent, radio didn’t disappear, but we listen in our cars now. Physical books haven’t vanished due to ebooks, but how we buy them has changed. Our future will likely include computers, mobile, AR, and VR. VR will be fantastic in certain situations, but it’s not going to be the right solution for every learning need.

Karl Kapp has noted that new technology is one reason the job outlook for instructional designers is still good.

Google Trends

One reason for the concern about instructional design dying is that it has been trending down on Google for a number of years. The trend has mostly flattened out, but it is much lower than it was in 2004. Brent Schlenker observed this trend in 2016.

Google Trends for "instructional design" 2004-2017

If you compare instructional design and learning design (the red line), you’ll see that learning design is now searched more often than instructional design. Learning design has also trended down, but not quite as far as instructional design.

Google trend comparing "instructional design" and "learning design"

While instructional design and learning design have trended down, elearning is trending up. I don’t believe the interest in online learning overall is likely to diminish, although it will evolve. Traditional self-paced elearning may decrease, but not all online learning.

 

Google trends showing elearning increasing

Looking Ahead

I see a fairly rosy future for instructional designers and learning designers, especially those who focus on lifelong learning and reflective practice. We will have to evolve to continue to be successful, but that need to constantly learn is part of what makes this field so rewarding. We will have to give up some of our old ways, but we can learn to change and be amazing.

“How does one become a butterfly?” she asked.
“You must want to fly so much that you are willing to give up being a caterpillar.”

—Trina Paulus, Hope for the Flowers

What do you think? Is instructional design doomed, or will we survive in a changed form?

 

 

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What I Learned at LSCon

I had a great experience at the eLearning Guild’s Learning Solutions Conference last week. The days were long, but the time was really valuable. My own session on Avoiding Voice Over Script Pitfalls went very well. I had a very active, engaged audience. We even had a voice over artist and an editor attending, which was perfect for my session. I’ve had some requests to give a virtual version of my session, so stay tuned for that.

It was so much fun to get to meet people in person who I’d only met online. I’ve built so many relationships with people online, but it’s great to see them live and connect a different way.

I took about 30 pages of notes over the 3 days. While everything is still fresh in my mind, I want to record some highlights. This list is one thing I can use from every session I attended. This isn’t necessarily the most important point from the speaker; in fact, some of these came from tangents. I’m focusing on what I think I can apply in my own work.

Information on all sessions can be found on the LS Con website.

Tim Gunn: A Natty Approach to Learning and Education

“There’s nothing more powerful than the word no.” Gunn talked about this in terms of advocating for the intellectual property rights for designers, but I think this applies to working with clients and SMEs as well.

Connie Malamed: Crash Course in Information Graphics for Learning

I loved the ideas for data visualization from this presentation. I don’t do infographics often, but I do need to present data and charts in courses (including one of my current projects). My big takeaway is that I need to do more sketching for charts. I’ve started to do more pencil and paper sketching for course layouts thanks to Connie’s last book, but visual brainstorming for charts would be helpful too.

Mark Sheppard: Building a Learning and Social-Collaborative Ecosystem in Slack

One note is that Learning Locker is working with xAPIs that can talk to Slack and pull data. Even without xAPI, you can get other data from Slack, like how many emojis were used to answer a poll.

Julie Dirksen: Diagnosing Behavior Change Problems

How many times has a client or SME given you a vague objective like, “Improve customer service”? That’s a nice business goal, but what does that mean for measurable performance? What behavior do you want to change? Julie shared her “photo test” for identifying behaviors. What would that behavior look like if you took a photo or video of it? Asking that question can help get to an observable behavior you can measure.

Karen Kostrinsky: Storytelling for Learning Impact

Think about the titles for your courses. What’s the most important takeaway? How can you put that takeaway in the title?

This session also had some discussion around the difference between scenarios and stories. Some people raised objections to using stories. I’m planning some future blog posts around those objections and questions.

Glen Keane: Harnessing Creativity in a Time of Technological Change

My favorite quote (I’ve already used it with a client during a video call): “Technology is like a 3-year-old at a formal dinner. Just when you want it to be at its best behavior, it starts acting up.” On a more serious note, Keane talked about how creativity means he can see it in his head, but he has to figure out how to get you to see it too. That’s a challenge we face creating elearning. We can see it in our heads (or the SMEs can see it in their heads), but we have to get it in a format learners can use.

Jane Bozarth: New Ideas for Using Social Tools for Learning

Jane shared lots of inspiration in this session (who knew that the TSA had a great Instagram account?). What I’m going to use first is a Pinterest board for sharing book lists. I started a draft version, but I want to switch the order (I forgot to load them backwards) and move this to a professional account rather than my personal one.

Jennifer Hofmann: Mindsets, Toolsets, and Skillsets for Modern Blended Learning

One quote stood out: “If you can test it online, you can teach it online.” When you think about blended learning, think about goals and objectives first, then assessment. Decide on the instructional strategy, technique, and technology after you figure out the assessment. Maybe some parts of the skill can’t be taught and assessed online, but think about the parts that can be.

Will Thalheimer: Neuroscience and Learning: What the Research Really Says

The big takeaway is that we should be skeptical of claims that we can use neuroscience to improve learning. The reality is that we don’t know enough about neuroscience to really improve learning design yet. Sometimes what people claim is neuroscience (which means fMRI data) is actually earlier cognitive psychology research with an incorrect label.

Panel: What’s Wrong with Evaluation?

This was with Will Thalheimer, Julie Dirksen, Megan Torrance, and Steve Forman, with JD Dillon moderating. Can’t you tell from just the list of names that this was a good discussion?

Julie Dirksen made the point that we as instructional designers don’t get enough feedback on our own work. We don’t really know whether what we’re doing is working or not. It takes 10,000 hours (give or take) to become an expert, but that only works if you get the right kind of feedback to continuously improve your practice.

On a related note, Megan Torrance asked, “Why don’t we do A/B testing on training?” I saw an example of that at the DemoFest, but I admit I’ve never done it myself. Maybe there’s a way to set that up for a future project so I can test what method really works (and get feedback for my own practice in the process).

Jennifer Nilsson: Best Practices Training Should Steal from Software Development

We talk a lot about stealing agile methods from software development, but Jennifer’s presentation was about other proven practices. For example, software developers add comments to their code to explain what something does and why it was done a certain way. We can’t always add comments to our development tools the way you can in true coding, but we can add notes in an off screen text box. That’s an easy solution that will save a lot of time if I have to go back to a complicated interaction a year later.

Diane Elkins: Responsive Design: A Comparison of Popular Authoring Tools

The first thing I’m going to change as a result of this session is what questions I ask clients after they say they want a mobile solution. I haven’t been asking enough follow up questions to understand what clients really mean by “responsive.” Do they mean tablets only? Are they OK with landscape only for phones? Is a scalable solution enough, or do they really want it fully responsive (adaptive)?

Julia Galef: Embracing a Mindset of Continuous Learning

We all use motivated reasoning sometimes and ignore evidence that doesn’t support the outcome we want. One way to check if you’re vulnerable to self-deception on a specific topic is the “button test.” Imagine you could press a button and find out the absolute, complete truth about something. If you find yourself hesitating to push that button, you might be vulnerable to motivated reasoning on that topic. If you know that, you can be aware of your cognitive biases and be more careful.

Photos

I took photos during the sessions and of the lovely sketchnotes taken for many sessions (including sessions I didn’t attend). Email readers, you may need to click through to the post to see the gallery of images.

I’m Speaking at LS Con

I’m presenting a session on Avoiding Voice Over Script Pitfalls. for the eLearning Guild’s Learning Solutions Conference. If you’re attending the conference, it’s session LS403 on Wednesday afternoon. (Unfortunately, I’m opposite Michael Allen and several other promising sessions. Sigh.) If you’re planning to attend the conference, I hope to meet you in person. This is the first conference I’ve attended in several years, and I’m excited to connect with people I only know online.

Learning Solutions Conference and Expo. I'm Speaking.

Here’s the official description:

You asked your voice-over artist for a natural, conversational recording, but what you got back is stiff and formal. You waste time going back and forth with voice-over talent about pronunciation or rewording. Too often, you need to re-record voice-over due to errors or confusion. You need a process to make your script writing more efficient and effective.

In this session, you will learn one proven technique you can use to avoid many voice-over script pitfalls, regardless of whether you use professional voice-over talent or record it yourself. You’ll also learn how to identify and correct common errors and how to adapt your writing style for more engaging, conversational narration. You’ll practice editing some sample scripts during the session so you can immediately apply what you learn. You will also receive a review checklist you can take with you and share with your team to improve the quality and consistency of your scripts.

More posts to come about LS Con!

ID and E-Learning Links (1/29/17)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Instructional Design and E-Learning Links