Benefits of Scenario-Based Learning

Why are scenarios effective for learning? They provide realistic context and emotional engagement. They can increase motivation and accelerate expertise. Here’s a selection of quotes explaining the benefits.

Benefits of Scenario-Based Learning

Accelerating Expertise with Scenario-Based e-Learning – The Watercooler Newsletter : The Watercooler Newsletter: Ruth Clark on how scenario-based elearning accelerates expertise and when to use it

What is Scenario-Based e-Learning?

  1. The learner assumes the role of an actor responding to a job realistic situation.
  2. The learning environment is preplanned.
  3. Learning is inductive rather than instructive.
  4. The instruction is guided.
  5. Scenario lessons incorporate instructional resources.
  6. The goal is to accelerate workplace expertise.

As you consider incorporating scenario-based e-Learning into your instructional mix, consider whether the acceleration of expertise will give you a return on investment.  For example, interviews with subject matter experts indicated that automotive technicians must complete about 100 work orders to reach a reasonable competency level in any given troubleshooting domain.  Comparing delivery alternatives, OJT would require around 200+ hours, instructor-led training would require around 100 hours, and scenario-based e-Learning simulations require approximately 33–66 hours.

Finally, many learners find scenario-based e-Learning more motivating than traditional instructional formats.  Solving a work-related problem makes the instruction immediately relevant.

The Benefits of Scenario Based Training: Scenario-based training better reflects real-life decision making

There is no linear path into what they are subjected. The situations are complex. They often fail and they learn by reflection, becoming much better at the judgements they make next time, even though next time the environment and the scenarios presented are different.

After completing a few exercises, they build their own view of the patterns that are evident and are able to move into a new scenario with confidence even if the environment and scenario is radically different.

Learning on reflection before plunging into the next scenario helps to build the patterns in the participants’ minds that are the evidence that they have learnt.

Quizzes based on scenarios with a, “What would you do next?”, question builds quick and fun repetition into the training programme, helping transfer from short term memory to long term memory.

Scenario-based-learning: PDF explaining theory and how to decide if SBL is the right strategy

Scenario-based learning is based on the principles of situated learning theory (Lave & Wenger, 1991), which argues that
learning best takes place in the context in which it is going to be used, and situated cognition, the idea that knowledge is
best acquired and more fully understood when situated within its context (Kindley, 2002).

SBL usually works best when applied to tasks requiring decision-making and critical thinking in complex situations. Tasks
that are routine to the students will require little critical thinking or decision-making, and may be better assessed using
other methods.

Checklist: Is SBL the right option? (Clark, 2009)
* Are the outcomes based on skills development or problem-solving?
* Is it difficult or unsafe to provide real-world experience of the skills?
* Do your students already have some relevant knowledge to aid decision-making?
* Do you have time and resources to design, develop, and test an SBL approach?
* Will the content and skills remain relevant for long enough to justify the development of SBL?

Learning through storytelling | Higher Education Academy: Why storytelling works for learning

Stories are effective tools for learning due to their ability to facilitate the following cognitive processes: i) concretizing, ii) assimilation, and iii) structurizing (Evans and Evans 1989).

Top 7 Benefits You Get From Scenario-Based Training: Infographic on benefits. “Falling forward,” accelerating time, critical thinking, shared context, engaging emotions, retention, trigger memories

Scenarios allow “falling forward”: Providing a safe space to fail helps build the capacity to fix mistakes as you would in real life

One thought on “Benefits of Scenario-Based Learning

  1. Christy Tucker,

    Your piece on scenario-based learning is excellent! I am a retired military officer and training was my specialty. I have worked with real-world exercises, battle simulations, board games, role playing, and computer-based scenarios. Without a doubt, the scenario-based learning environment is more engaging for the learners but expensive. The military decision to conduct a real-world exercise is often substituted with artificial training that cost less money. Of course, there is no substitute for the face to face engagement but the various other scenario based training options reduce the train up before fighting a war.

    In any training scenario it is hard to determine the actual return on investment, but certainly, companies can provide online scenario-based training to employees before allowing employees provide services, produce products, or operate equipment. The challenge besides cost is the skills required to generate and update scenarios to keep employee training current. I am not sure if this is a function of an instructional designer but it must be considered. Please read the abstract for the attached article on automating scenario generation (Zook et al., n.d.). In my opinion, some elements are useful in for-profit organizations.

    References

    Zook, A., Lee-Urban, S., Riedl, M. O., Holden, H. K., Sottilare, R. A., & Brawner, K. B. (n.d.). Automated scenario generation: Toward tailored and optimized military training in virtual environments. Retrieved from (www.cc.gatech.edu/~riedl/pubs/fdg12.pdf)

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